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Information Centre Slaný
FOR TOURISTS - All about the town of Slaný, its history, monuments and today’s appearance. Tips for trips in the surroundings.
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Infocentrum Slaný
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Culturally Historical Wandering 10 - 13

This project is co-financed by the Central Bohemia Region.  
http://www.centralbohemia.cz/?language=2 

10. Culturally Historical Wandering around Slaný

Třebíz – Klobuky – Čeradice – Páleček – Stradonice – Lisovice – Vyšínek – Páleč – Peruc

TŘEBÍZ
The beginnings of the village and the local fortress are not documented in writing. The Ethnical Musem in Třebíz is dedicated to the folk culture of the local region. It is a proof of the development of folk building industry, way of living, agricultural farming, and village life in general. House No. 1, called Cífkův statek, the seat of the reeve with a right to run a tap-room, with a grange, a cellar, stables, and other farm buildings. House No. 4 has an interior of a little village shop, little cottages No. 62 and 64, originally the rent-charges of the estates, and No. 10 and 11, former cottars´ houses, equipped correspondingly to the turn of the 19th and the 20th century. House No. 10 shelters a half-timbered, rammed earth barn in the garder, documenting the construction style of the end of the 17th and of the 18th century. Also house No. 2 – called Šubrtův statek – presents an interesting example of folk architecture around Slaný.
St. Martin´s Baroque Chapel in the village green dates back to the half of the 18th century.
The house where the priest and the writer Václav Beneš Třebízský was born (No. 19) was open to public in 1904, and it is a permanent exposition documenting his life and works.
Above the village, there are sandstone rocks with caved cellars and a Piety embossment from an unknown folk artist. On the rock, there is a monument dedicated to Václav Beneš Třebízský on the 14th August 1892. The authors were František Hergessel and František Procházka. From Třebíz, we will set off along road No. 237 leading to Klobuky.

KLOBUKY
The first written documents about the village are from 1226. In the beginning of the 14th century, the local rulers built a fortress with a church under the hill, or a ruler´s court. The first remarks about a church with a vicarage school are from 1352. In place of this church, the present St. Laurence Church was built anew in 1729, with a dominant tower and adjacent cemetery. Memorial plaques on the church and on the vicarage remind of the local activities of Jindřich Šimon Baar, the writer, in 1899-1909. At the cemetery, there are tombs of important families of Zapa and Malypetr. An alcove chapel in the village is from the 19th century. Feudal brewery was already here at the turn of the 16th and the 17th century. In 1705, the canonry abolished all the breweries within the dominion, and the modernized brewery in Klobuky remained the only one. In 1904, the Schwarzenbergs bought the brewery, and they made it a subsidiary of their brewery in Louny. In 1906, the brewery got a new malt house, where malt was made until 1938. Beer brewing stopped in 1921 in this brewery. Ancient linden tree in the brewery´s courtyard became a commemorative theme for the Svatopluk Čech´s works, the writer who spent his childhood and student years in our region. His father was the manager of the Vraný dominion. The sugar mill established in 1871, and completed in 1872, was the only guild – agricultural sugar mill in our region. The Sokol house was open by a great Sokol festival, and a gathering of the Sladkovský Sokol district on the 15th July 1923. On the same day, also the memorial plaque on the house where Jan Malypetr was born (1815-1890) was dedicated to this physical training teacher, and co-founder of the Czech physical training. In the same house, also the Karel Malypetr was born (1815-1880) – a lawyer, archaeologist, nationist, and the first trainer of Sokol in Prague – and Jan Malypetr (1873-1947) – a minister and chairman of the chamber of deputies. A new memorial plaque on the Malypetr family house was dedicated in August 2003. Above the village, on the right hand side, in a field next to the road to Telce, there is a monumental menhir called Stone Man.
We will walk on past Čeradice to get to Páleček.

PÁLEČEK
A stone belfry is worth our attention, originally with three bells (now only two), the greatest of which is the work of Brikcí of Cimperk, and a Late-Baroque charnel house, built together with the Church of Visitation of Virgin Mary in 1776-1778. Wall paintings with scenes from the Old and the New Testament were preserved in the charnel house interior. These painted decorations are unique in our region, as well as the Baroque charnel house.

STRADONICE
The first remarks appeared as early as 1318. During the construction works on a road leading from Slaný to Budyně, fragments of bronze bracelets were found here, and a lot of urns from a pagan burial ground were found in the "Na Okrouhlíku" locality. There are monuments of folk architecture here, like the mill, No. 22, with a bricked storeyed grinding room from the 2nd half of the 18th century, and ground-floor farming buildings. There is a Baroque sculpture of St. John and Paul from 1782. At the end of the village, in the direction of Páleč, there is a stone Calvary, 230 cm high. We will continue to Vyšínek, past Lisovice.

VYŠÍNEK
The village was first mentioned in 1263 as the property of the chief justice named Čeč, who sold or donated the village, together with Drchkov, to the Prague Canonry of All Saints at the Prague Castle. A Baroque farming house No. 5 is interesting, having the Kinský family emblem in the portal. The cross in the village green is from 1855.

Feudal Court in Vyšínek
The farming court used to be a part of the Zlonice dominion. It was one of the 23 feudal courts, which belonged to this dominion in 1845, and which even today form expressive constructional dominants in a lot of villages around Zlonice. A storeyed Baroque grange was declared a nationally protected cultural monument in 2003, together with the neighbouring stables and the barn. The grange is the oldest building in this group, there is a datation 1739 on the entrance portal with the emblem of count Filip Josef Kinský. The original four-storey wooden interior was preserved, being a demonstration of professional carpenter work of our predecessors. Since 2001, it has served the purposes of a seat of a civic association named Aranka – Dvůr Vyšínek, which deals with educational and sport programmes for children and the youth. There is a western horse-riding club here.

PÁLEČ
The village was first documented in 1318. The local rulers built a fortress with a round tower on the right bank of the stream, on a hill above the village. The fortress became extinct during the Thirty Years´ War. A renewed Baroque cross from 1712 in the village green is an interesting monument. The Gothic single-isle Church of the Birth of Virgin Mary was already mentioned in the years 1333-38. On the southern portal, there is an emblem of Bishop Jan IV of Dražice. At the cemetery near the church, there is a Baroque mortuary (charnel house). We will arrive at Peruc, passing through Vraný. On the left hand side, in a field near the road to Peruc, there is a memorial of the Three Emperors´ Encounter. The military memorial was built here in 1913, to commemorate a centennary anniversary of the victorious war against Napoleon. In 1813, a great military review of the allied armies of the attending Russian tzar Alexander I., Prussian king Frederick Wilhelm III., and Austrian emperor Francis I. took place in the fields between Vraný and Peruc.

PERUC
The first remarks about the village date back to 1170. Around the 12th or the 13th century, a castle was built here, which is documented by a finding of old Romanic cellarage, perhaps the dungeon, in the castle´s northern wing. The castle used to stand above a strong spring, which runs out of the cellarage into the Božena fountain, mentioned for the first time as early as 1401. In place of the castle, Jetřich of Peruc built a strong fortress in 1319. A number of families had the village and the castle in possession during the 15th and the 16th century. At the time of the Ledebur family, in the years 1760-70, the Renaissance castle was rebuilt in a Rococo style. During the occupation, and then until 1954, the castle served the purposes of a depository for the University Library in Leipzig. In the southern part of the castle, academic painter Emil Filla lived and worked, and after he died, his memorial hall was open here. Sculptural decorations of the castle´s front are from the workshop of Mr. Platzer, the sculptor. Under the castle´s north wing, there is the Božena fountain, and a little lower down the road to Slavětín, there is the hundreds-of-years old Oldřich´s oak. The originally medieval Church of St. Peter and Paul has been mentioned as a vicarage church since 1384. It was built anew in the years 1724-1725, and renewed in 1824. There are the statues of St. Václav and of St. John of Nepomuk in the niches alongside the entrance, there is the statue of Christ above them, with St. Peter and Paul by his side, the church´s patrons. The gable above the entrance portal commemorates the year of the completion of the building (1724), and both the founders of the church, Alexandr Jan and Anna Alžběta of Ledebur. The church together with the vicarage, the village green, and the castle create a beautiful baroque unit. The statue of St. John of Nepomuk near the church was made by K. I. Platzer, dated 1857. The memorial for the killed in World War I in the square is the work of E. Kodet from 1922.

The overall length of the track is 22.5 km. It is suitable for tourists, also on bicycles. The path includes roads of the 2nd and 3rd class. From Peruc, it is also possible to take the train to Slaný, or continue on marked cycling tracks.

Třebíz – Klobuky 3,4 km
Klobuky – Čeradice 1,5 km
Čeradice – Páleček 1,3 km
Páleček – Stradonice/Lisovice 3,7 km
Lisovice – Vyšínek 1,3 km
Vyšínek – Páleč 2,6 km
Páleč – Peruc 8,7 km


11. Culturally Historical Wandering around Slaný

Slaný – Knovíz – Želenice – Třebusice – Holousy – Brandýsek – Cvrčovice – Olšany – Slaný

The track begins at the Information Centre in the Masarykovo náměstí Square (the former Piaristic College house, No. 159, interesting building of the old town hall, No. 3). We will leave the square via the Vinařická Street, past the Modletický house, and the St. Gothard Church, and below the church, we will start walking uphill from the roundabout along the Pražská Street, in the direction of Prague.
On the way from Slaný to Prague, we will set off along road No. 00724, and we will turn left at the crossroads onto road No. 00712

KNOVÍZ
Pre-historic settlement of the territory of the existing village today is proved by a number of archaeological findings – from the younger Stone Age, past the late Stone age, up to the barrow culture of the younger Bronze Age. The last then developed into a culture named "knovízská", thanks to the localities here, which later developed into the Bylany culture. Besides numerous findings of utility objects, and skeleton remains, both human and animal, also split human bones were discovered here, proving ritual cannibalism. The first written remarks about the village date back to 1088. In 1305, king Václav donated the village to the privileged royal town of Slaný.
All Saints Church used to be a vicarage church even in the oldest times (1352). The church was gothic originally, and it was extended in the 18th century by an annex vestry building. In 1846 it was rebuilt and it was repaired in the years 1993-4, and in 2005 for the last time.
Leaving Knovíz in the direction of Brandýsek, we can see interesting sand-stone rock formations on the left hand side, called "The Hus Pulpit" in accordance with folk tradition.

ŹELENICE
Primeval and early medieval settlement is proved by archaeological findings, the greatest being an extensive burial ground (105 graves) of the hillfort culture (9th – 11th century).
The first written remarks about the village date back to 1227-33. In 1305, the entire village was donated to the property of the royal town of Slaný by Václav II. During the Thirty Years´ War, the village was completely destroyed and unpopulated, but before the end of the 17th century, it was rebuilt and settled again.
The Church of St. James the greater was originally a Romanic building with an isle from the 12th century and the presbytery from the first half of the 13th century. In the second half of the 14th century, it was rebuilt in a Gothic style, and later it was rebuilt again in the second half of the 17th century.
Wooden belfry on a stone base wall near the church is from the 16th century, according to two original bells (1581 and 1613), and it was modified in the 18th century. Local houses No. 1, 2, 3, 5, and 6 are monuments of folk architecture.

TŘEBUSICE
Archaeological findings in the village surroundings proving pre-historic settlements mostly belong to the Želenice findings. From the 13th century on (1227), the village belonged to the Benedictines of the St. George Monastery at the Prague Castle. The Thirty Years´ War spared the village, unlike many others in the neighbourhood. The chapel in the village green with a storeyed superstructure of belfry from the beginning of the 19th century.

HOLOUSY
The first historical data documented in writing is the same as in the village of Třebusice. From 1227 on, it belonged to the Benedictines of St. George at the Prague Castle. In the 15th century, the village was abandoned, and we can trace its fate after the Thirty Years´ War in 1654. At the turn of the 18th and of the 19th century, the village of Holousy belonged to the united settlements of Brandýsek, Olšany, Holousy, and Cvrčovice. The ruins of the former extensive grange belonging to Francis Joseph I. dominate the village.
We will set off to the left uphill towards the mining shaft of the former mine named Michael.

BRANDÝSEK
The village of Brandýsek was established by uniting two original villages – Brandýsek and Olšany. The Hájek´s Chronicle mentions the village as early as 975. Municipal files document the oldest records on Olšany in 1316 and on Brandýsek in 1345.
Both the villages only had several tens of citizens; both were abandoned during the Thirty Years´ War. The real boom came when coal was discovered and mined here. In the middle of the 19th century, the mines named Michael and Layer are excavated, and nearby grew a settlement to accommodate the miners and their families.
When leaving Olšany in the direction of Knovíz, there is an alcove chapel on the right hand side of the road. It is tied to a sad legend about a foreign army officer who shot two children here during the war, but then came back later and had a chapel built here to reconcile his conscience. The chapel was originally placed on the other side of the road, and it was transferred to the current position during the construction of the motorway.
On the way from Olšany to Kladno, it takes about 700 metres to get to a water park named Čabárna, where our walk ends. From Čabárna, it is not far to Kladno, where we can take a bus back to Slaný.

Water Park Čabárna
The natural water park is situated on the Týnecký Stream. The entire area was polluted by the waste from the mines, then the lakes were renewed and planted with fish. At present, there are a lot of animals, both aquatic and earthbound. Among the aquatic animals, there are different kinds of fish, as well as turtles or nutrias. Among the earthbound, there are for example the ferret, or the fox. Nearby the park, in the direction of Brandýsek, there is a birds´ rescue station – AVES.

CVRČOVICE
According to the old documents, the village was donated by king Vratislav I. to the Vyšehrad Canonry in 1070. The village then belonged to the Benedictines from Břevnov for a long time. The local mine named Ferdinand was excavated in the years 1849 – 52, and it was one of the greatest mines in the Czech lands. In 1882, the State Rails Company bought it. Nearby, the miners´ colony named Čabárna was established. At the end of the 19th century, mining was in progress in the Antonín, Ludmila, and Vítek mines. There is a cycling track leading past "Ferdinandka". The village chapel is from the second half of the 18th century.

The overall length of the track is 24 km. It is suitable for tourists, also on bicycles. The path includes roads of the 2nd and 3rd class.

Slaný – Knovíz 5,4 km
Knovíz – Želenice 1,7 km
Želenice – Třebusice 2,5 km
Třebusice – Holousy 2,8 km
Holousy – Brandýsek 0,5 km
Brandýsek – Cvrčovice 0,5 km
Cvrčovice – Olčany 0,3 km
Olšany – Slaný 10 km


12. Culturally Historical Wandering around Slaný

Smečno – Svinařov – Libušín – Kačice – Nová Studnice – Hradečno – Nová Ves – Ledce - Přelíc

The track begins at the Information Centre in the Masarykovo náměstí Square (the former Piaristic College house, No. 159), we will set off along the Masnokrámská Street on to the Komenského náměstí Square, and we will take the Fortenská Street to get into the Záfortenská St. The Smečenská Street will take us out of town, all the way to the crossroads in the direction of Hrdlív. We will continue straight on to Smečno.

SMEČNO
The Smečno fortress was built in the beginning of the 13th century, and than in 1418, it became a property of Markvart of Martinice by purchase. His son named Bořita had this fortress rebuilt to a castle. Smečno remained the property of the Martinic and the Clam-Martinic family until 1921. As a part of the castle, there is also the Chapel of St. Anne, and in consequence with the origin of this chapel, there is an annual, traditional Anne´s Fair in Smečno. The castle today serves the purposes of a social care institution, and it is not open to public. However, we can have a look at the extensive manor park with rich sculptural decorations, and an interesting salla terrena from the first half of the 18th century. The path to the castle is decorated by two obelisks from the same era. Platzer´s Holy Trinity Sculpture in front of the castle is from 1744. The Holy Trinity Church was built in the second half of the 14th century. Tombstones of the local nobility were embedded in the outer enclosure walls. Opposite the church, there is a Renaissance deanery building from the end of the 16th century, and a restored statue of St. Donát, which originally used to be situated in the fields near Smečno. The stone obelisk with a cross in front of the school is from 1607, and St. George statue on the square dates back to the 18th century.

SVINAŘOV
The first remarks about the village date back to 1328. The Vyšehrad Canonry had a fortress built in Svinařov in the years 1328-32, and the "newly built" fortress was let on hire in 1332 to Fricek Dlouhý, a Prague burgess. In the second half of the 14th century, the fortress was sold. The fortress was not used, and it became extinct. A stone embossment with Piety is walled up in a blind window recess of the estate No. 1.

LIBUŠÍN
Archaeological findings document an unwalled settlement here as early as the 6th-7th century. The oldest legends present it as the seat of princess Libuše, who had it built around 650, then she married Přemysl here, and she also established Prague from here. The local fortified settlement was established in the 9th – 10th century. It was established as a border fortified settlement to protect the Bohemian tribe against the Lučany tribe, and as a gathering place for greater military preparedness. After the Bohemian tribes were united, it lost its original defensive purpose, and it practically became extinct. At the end of the 13th century, the St. George Church was built here. Near the St. George Church, a wooden belfry on an octagonal base wall forms a part of the cemetery. The oldest preserved tombstone dates back to 1644, according to the datation.
Libušín´s modern history was influenced by the finding of coal. The oldest mine here was named Mayrau – Robert, established in 1874, then it was St. John (1885-6), and then the Max mine (1888), and the Schöller mine (1895-6). Libušín, which was originally an agricultural and craftsmen village, grew to be the village of miners, workers, and craftsmen, and in 1919, it was promoted to a town. St. Prokop Church in Libušín is a pseudo-Gothical building from 1908; the statue of St. Prokop, the patron of the miners in front of the church is from 1730. In 1927, a memorial dedicated to the killed in World War I was built here.

KAČICE
The village is first documented in writing in 1318. The former fortress was probably built already by the first rulers of Kačice. However, written documents mention it first in 1437, in the time of Ctibor of Svojkov. When the village was annexed to the Smečno dominion, the fortress ceased to serve its purpose, and later became extinct altogether. It was probably situated on the premises of the former grange. The cross nearby the village chapel was built "at the expense of the citizens of Kačice in memory of the gracious summer of 1851"; the inscription on the second cross situated near the road, opposite house No. 53, is not legible. The chapel is also dated 1851. A stone statue of St. Blažej in the village green was originally a tombstone of Jan Wolfgang Herstorffer, a stonemason, from 1711. In the recess of house No. 5, there is a damaged statue of St. Vojtěch. Both the statues were found on a forest path near an extinct settlement named Německá Lhota, and they were transferred to Kačice in 1817.
North of Kačice, by the road, there is a small village surrounded by beautifull forests – Nová Studnice.

NOVÁ STUDNICE
It was established in place of a cleared forest nearby two extinct villages of Svídné and Humniště. In 1711, Jiří Adam Bořita of Martinice had the greatest estate of the Smečno dominion built in place of the extinct village and fortress named Humniště, and named it after the family name of the founder – Martinice. In the Nová Studnice village green, there is a nice restored chapel, and a statue in a recess of a corner building in the direction of Drnek – unidentified so far. From Nová Studnice, we will set off to the right in the direction of Hradečno, with an annexed village of Nová Ves.

HRADEČNO – NOVÁ VES
A stronghold or a fortified settlement – these were the predecessors of today´s villages. Yeomen´s water fortress in Hradečno used to be situated in the middle of the Hradečno valley, and its location presented a typical stone water fortress of the medieval province. It was abandoned for some time, and supposedly during the 14th and the 15th century, its owners had it restored again. The first written remarks are from the 14th January 1523, and the next then from 1542. The first written remarks about Nové Hradečno – Nová Ves date back to 1594. In 1749, a new half-timbered belfry was built in Hradečno. Nová Studnice also forms a part of the village. The settlement was established in the first half of the 18th century around a sheep-cote, which belonged to Clam of Martinice. The chapel in the village green dates back to approximately the same time. In the second half of the 18th century, Clam of Martinice had a forest-keeper´s lodge built, named "Obora" (Game-preserve). The Smečno tree-lined alley leads to this preserve, which the suzerains from Smečno castle used to get there.

LEDCE
Pre-historic settlement of the existing village locality is proved by findings of skeletons bent in the tombs overlaid by stones, with vessels, a stone chisel, and amber beads. As far as bronze is concerned, a chisel was found here, bracelets, "Únětice pin", other pins, and three golden rolls.
The village was first mentioned in 1400. St. John the Baptist Chapel in the village green is from 1782, and it was enlarged and modified in a pseudo-Romanic style in 1866. Among the sights, there is house No. 3, decorated by a stone plate with an embossment of "Laying in the Tomb" from the 16th century, and house No. 24 – a Baroque estate with a preserved Baroque gable on the residential building, and a Baroque gate.

PŘELÍC
Pre-historic settlement of the land register of the village, which also used to be called Přelice, is proved by pagan burial ground discovered in 1894. The first written remarks date back to the beginning of the 14th century, but some architectural features of the local church document the fact that both the church, and the village, have already existed in the 13th century, maybe as early as the end of the 12th century.
St. Peter and Paul Church was built in the second half of the 14th century, with more ancient features, as it was mentioned above, and it was modified in the second half of the 16th century. Wooden belfry on a stone base wall in the west corner of the cemetery probably dates back to the 17th century. The road will take us back to Slaný.

Smečno – Svinařov 2 km
Svinařov – Libušín 2,5 km
Libušín – Kačice 6,5 km
Kačice – Nová Studnice 3 km
Nová Studnice – Hradečno 1,5 km
Hradečno – Nová Ves 1 km
Nová Ves – Ledce 2 km
Ledce – Přelíc 4 km

The overall length of the track is 22.5 km. It is suitable for tourists, also on bicycles. The path includes roads of the 2nd and 3rd class.


13. Culturally Historical Wandering around Slaný

Slaný – Dolín – Hobšovice –Velvary – Neuměřice – Kamenný Most – Zvoleněves – Podlešín – Knovíz – Slaný

The track begins at the Information Centre in the Masarykovo náměstí Square. From here, we will set off in the direction of the Slaný cemetery and the monastery with the Holy Trinity Church (we will pass the Velvarská gate from the turn of the 13th century); the Na Vinici Street will take us to the vine-growers´and the fishermen´s column, and we will turn left and continue uphill, or we will go straight to the cross, as both ways will take us to Dolín.

THE COLUMN OF THE VINE-MAKERS AND THE FISHERMEN FROM SLANÝ
It is a copy from the workshop of the academic sculptor Václav Nejtek. The column was originally placed by the wall of the cemetery in Ovčáry, near the St. Václav Chapel. Its model is exhibited in the Slaný Geographical Museum

DOLÍN
The first written remarks about the village date back to 1325. The remark about the local Church of St. Simon and Juda with beautiful secession decorations is of the same date. The old cemetery by the church is the place where the blacksmith, the writer and the poet named Valerián Pejša was buried. Below the church, we will turn left, and we will get to Beřovice. On the way, we will pass an alcove chapel from the 1st half of the 19th century.

HOBŠOVICE
The village as such was first mentioned in 1228, when it was a property of the St. George Monastery at the Prague Castle. The vicarage church of St. Václav had its vicar as early as 1352. The original St. Václav Church had no tower, only a wooden belfry. When the belfry fell apart in 1850, a tower with three bells was built up on the west side of the church. The first bell had a Czech inscription on it, dated 1550, the second had a Latin inscription, dated 1423, and the third from 1663. St. Václav Church became a vicarage church again in 1856.

MALOVARY
The first written documents about the village date back to 1302. There is a preserved Church of All Saints from the original village of Malovary, some sources also call it the Mother of God Church. In 1787, Emperor Joseph II abolished the church, but it was consecrated again in 1792. Ferdinand Velc mentions the Church or the Chapel of All Saints as an ancient monument of Romanic style. The village became extinct, and it was annexed to Velvary around the end of the 17th century. The former Malovarská Gate in Velvary even began to be called Slánská Gate from the end of the 17th century on. It was pulled down in 1878.
A water fortress named Hrádek was probably built in the time of Přemysl Otakar II. The first written remarks date back to 1326, when a burgess named Hostík of Budyně was the owner. It was a property of the Berka family from Dubá until 1380. In 1513, in the time of Bohuslav Chrt of Rtín, the owners were relieved from fealty. In 1526, the village of Malovary was bought by the town of Velvary, and the Hrádek fortress was abandoned eas early as the 16th century. During the Thirty Years War, it became completely extinct. Its foundations were discovered during the Malovarský Lake dessication in the 18th century. A high portal in the wall by the road crossing to Nabdín and Neuměřice was probably a part of its remains.

VELVARY
The town of Velvary was established on an old provincial trail leading from Prague to Saxony. The first written remarks about Velvary date back to 1282 (1088 according to different authors), when it is mentioned in the Vyšehrad Canonry. The Majesty of King Vladislav II of Jagellon from the 4th April 1482 promoted the village of Velvary to a town with a right of fortification and gates, of a St. Simon and Juda fair, of collecting customs duties, and a right of a mileage. The Thirty Years War meant the greatest disaster for the town, as it was subject to a number of raids, both greater and smaller, plunderings, and indulgences, and it was completely burnt out on the 30th October 1693 by the Banner Swedes. St. Catherine Church is a Gothic monument at heart, with later Renaissance, Baroque and Gothic-revival adjustments. The first remarks speaking about it as a vicarage church date back to the first half of the 14th century. There are Baroque statues of St. Catherine and St. Joseph nearby the church, both made by a Velvary master A. Střevský. House No. 1 on the square, the townhall, has a late-Renaissance ground floor from the years 1618-1620, built by Santini Malvazione, an Italian builder; Baroque modifications are from the years 1723-24, realized by master Jan Wolf. It was rebuilt radically in the years 1793-97, supposedly according to a project of Ignác Palliardi. Marian Column on the square was created by sculptors from Litoměřice, František and Matěj Tollinger, and by a stonemason named Antonín Falke in 1716-1719. Along the column´s perimeter, there are statues of St. Václav, Prokop, Sebastian, and Florian, the statue of Virgin Mary Immaculate is at the top. There are monumental houses, such as the Feudal Pub, which was built by Prague Baroque builder Pavel Ignác Bayer in 1696-1698, or the Renaissance houses No. 8, the so called Bárta´s house, and No. 57 named Reduta, the house named "U zlaté hvězdy" (At the Golden Star) with an arbour, and a late-Baroque house No. 115. In the suburban district in the direction of Kralupy nad Vltavou, there is a late-Renaissance cemetery church of St. George, built in the years 1613-16 by Santini Malvazione, the builder.

NEUMĚŘICE
The oldest preserved remark about the village of Neuměřice dates back to 1158. Master Martin Bacháček Nauměřský of Nauměřice is the personality of the village, born in the so called Carda estate, No. 1 in 1539. He was an astronomer, a matematician, and a Chancellor of Prague University. To a great extent, he became the predecessor of J. A. Komenský. The local primary school was named after him, being consecrated and open for usage in September 1885. The village became the main coming-out centre of Labour Strikes between spring and autumn of 1919. The next major strike with a mass expansion happened in 1920. In 1929, the local football sports club was established. The chapel in the village is from 1800.

KAMENNÝ MOST
According to the Vyšehrad deed from 1088, Vratislav II gave three granges in Kamenný Most to the Vyšehrad Canonry. Also the family of the most renowned mayor in the town of Slaný, Bartoš Pták (Ptáček) of Kamenemost, came from this village. This mayor had his place among the sworn aldermen as early as 1444, and he remained there until 1487.

ZVOLENĚVES
The first written remarks about the village date back to 1318. The rulers dwelled in fortresses situated in place of the ruins of the present castle, on a hill behind the village. The fortress was first mentioned in 1401. In the second half of the 16th century, the local Gothic fortress was rebuilt in a Renaissance style, and a brewery was annexed to it. The original fortress was extended, and rebuilt to serve the purposes of offices and flats for the dominion officials, whereby a baroque castle came into being. A new castle was built in the beginning of the 19th century. St. Martin Church, Gothic originally, was first mentioned in 1352, and it was rebuilt in a baroque style around 1745. There are tombstones from the 16th and the 18th century walled up in the presbytery walls. A chapel with the tomb of the dominion owners was rebuilt in 1810 to serve the purposes of a grange. A profile of the chapel was preserved in the chapel´s west wall. A late-Baroque vicarage is from 1808. An extensive sugar mill complex came into being in the years 1858-59. In 1921 it burnt out, and a new state sugar mill was built on the site of the fire, the most up-to-date in its time. At the end of the 1990s, it was modernized again, quite expensively, but soon afterwards it discontinued its activities, as the last sugar mill around Slaný.

PODLEŠÍN
The village is situated in the Svatojiřský Stream valley. It was first mentioned as early as 1052, when a castle was here. In 1088, the three granges with vineyards belonged to the Vyšehrad church. There were coal mines in the surroundings, which are extinct already, the property of Prague Ironmongery Company, and an iron ore mine. The list of historical sights mentions a La Tene burial ground with findings of bronze bracelets and pins of the Duchcov type. At present, there is a monument protected by state in the area, the so called "Podlešínská jehla" (consisting of Ledce arconas of Upper Carbon). The railway bridge, which dominates the village, was pronounced a national cultural landmark. Monumental trees: small-leaf linden tree near the house No. 114, forest oak near the house No. 51.

KNOVÍZ
Pre-historic settlement of the territory of the existing village today is proved by a number of archaeological findings – from the younger Stone Age, past the late Stone Age, up to the barrow culture of the younger Bronze Age. The last then developed into a culture named "knovízská", thanks to the localities here, which later developed into the Bylany culture. Besides numerous findings of utility objects, and skeleton remains, both human and animal, also split human bones were discovered here, proving ritual cannibalism. The first written remarks about the village date back to 1088. In 1305, king Václav donated the village to the privileged royal town of Slaný. All Saints Church used to be a vicarage church even in the oldest times (1352). The church was Gothic originally, and it was extended in the 18th century by an annex vestry building. In 1846 it was rebuilt and it was repaired in the years 1993-4, and in 2005 for the last time.
Leaving Knovíz in the direction of Brandýsek, we can see interesting sand-stone rock formations on the left hand side, called "The Hus Pulpit".

Slaný – Dolín 3,5 km
Dolín – Hobšovice 4 km
Hobšovice – Nabdín 3,5 km
Nabdín – Velvary 3,5 km
Velvary – Neuměřice 5,5 km
Neuměřice – Kamenný Most 1 km
Kamenný Most – Zvoleněves 2,5 km
Zvoleněves – Podlešín 2 km
Podlešín – Knovíz 2,5 km
Knovíz – Slaný 5 km

The overall length of the track is 33 km. It is suitable for tourists, also on bicycles. The path includes roads of the 2nd and 3rd class

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